Types of Cooperatives

  • Fruit and Vegetable Cooperatives
    • http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/rbs/pub/cir113.pdf
      • This article tells of the important role cooperatives play in marketing these products. It also describes the two main functions these cooperatives perform: marketing products in fresh or processed form and bargaining for terms of trade. Cooperative marketing tools and strategies, marketing agreements and contracts, pooling, and marketing orders are discussed. Future issues facing these cooperatives are also examined.
      • CIR 1 Section 13. 60 pgs. 1990. James A. Jacobs.
      • Library ID Number: 2732
  • Livestock and Wool Cooperatives
    • http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/rbs/pub/cir114.pdf
      • Gives a brief history of livestock and wool cooperatives in the United States. Reports overall statistics for present livestock and wool cooperatives in accounting for farmers' cash receipts. Future challenges and opportunities for livestock and wool cooperatives also are reviewed.
      • CIR 1 Section 14. 34 pgs. 1979. John T. Haas, David L. Holder, and Clement E. Ward.
      • Library ID Number: 2704
  • Cooperatives in the Dairy Industry
    • http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/rbs/pub/cir116.pdf
      • This article outlines the history and development of dairy cooperatives in the U.S. It also provides a greater understanding of these cooperatives and describes their size, scope, and marketing functions, how they are financed, how they operate, prospects for the future, and other cooperative dairy industry organizations.
      • CIR 1 Section 16. 59 pgs. Revised 1995. Carolyn Betts Liebrand.
      • Library ID Number: 7260
  • Cotton Cooperatives
    • http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/rbs/pub/cir118.pdf
      • Farmer cooperatives play a major role in merchandising American cotton and cottonseed products, as well as performing and coordinating most of the services of the marketing system. This report examines cotton gins, compresses, lint marketing, and cottonseed oil. Also provides an overview of the historical development of cotton cooperatives. The publication concludes with a discussion of challenges and opportunities facing cooperatives.
      • CIR 1 Section 18. 21 pgs. 1985. Bruce 1. Reynolds.
      • Library ID Number: 2705
  • Special Crops Cooperatives
    • http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/rbs/pub/cir119.pdf
      • This article covers number, organization, operation, services, and benefits of cooperatives marketing tobacco, sugar and sweeteners, dry beans and peas, seed, forest products, fish, and other specialized farm products.
        Cooperatives marketing such crops as flowers and bulbs, hops, nursery stock, wild rice, turpentine, and coffee are also covered.
      • CIR 1 Section 19. 53 pgs. Reprinted 1987. Fred E. Hulse, Gilbert W. Biggs, Donald M. Simon, and J. Warren Mather.
      • Library ID Number: 2706
  • Cooperative Supply and Equipment Operations
    • http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/rbs/pub/cir120.pdf
      • Four out of five farmer cooperatives handled supplies in 1986. Total sales exceeded $2.4 billion. This report discusses the diversity of supplies provided and activities in retailing, wholesaling, assembling, and manufacturing. Other topics report how these cooperatives developed, what benefits they provide, and the challenges they face.
      • CIR 1 Section 20. 43 pgs. 1989. Lloyd C. Biser.
      • Library ID Number: 2708
  • Cooperative Feed and Animal Health Operations
    • http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/rbs/pub/cir121.pdf
      • This report discusses the purchasing, distribution, and manufacturing of livestock feed ingredients on retail and wholesale levels of agricultural cooperatives. Livestock feeds distributed by cooperatives-poultry (principally broilers), swine, beef and dairy cattle, and rabbits-are tested at a series of research farms across the U.S. Information from results are exchanged among the member regional cooperatives in the U.S. and Canada. Cooperative involvement in the allied animal health products industry--biologicals, pharmaceuticals, and feed additives is also discussed on retail and wholesale levels.
      • CIR 1 Section 21. 31 pgs. 1991. Donald L. Vogelsang, J. Warren Mather and E. Eldon Eversull.
      • Library ID Number: 2703
  • Cooperative Agrichemical and Seed Operations
    • http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/rbs/pub/cir122.pdf
      • This report covers retailing, wholesaling, and mixing and manufacturing operations for fertilizer, farm chemicals, and seed. One section discusses limestone distribution and quarrying while another views the operations of an interregional fertilizer manufacturing and distributing cooperative. Research activities of an interregional seed cooperative are also reviewed. History, benefits, and challenges relating to the three major topics are also discussed.
      • CIR 1 Section 22. 66 pgs. 1990. Donald L. Vogelsang, J. Warren Mather and E. Eldon Eversull.
      • Library ID Number: 2441
  • Cooperative Petroleum Operations
    • http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/rbs/pub/cir123.pdf
      • This article traces the increasing involvement of cooperatives in handling petroleum products. Operations are described in terms of retailing, wholesaling, refining and blending, crude oil production, and transportation. The extent of cooperative activities in handling related products such as equipment, automotive accessories, and services is also covered.
      • CIR 1 Section 23. 26 pgs. Revised 1996. John R. Dunn and E. Eldon Eversull.
      • Library ID Number: 2811
  • Cooperatives in International Trade
    • http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/rbs/pub/cir127.pdf
      • Fueled by population growth, rising incomes, and liberalized trade rules, today's marketplace offers many opportunities for businesses including cooperatives to act globally in marketing food and fiber products. Reviews scope of cooperative exports, alliances, direct investments, foreign sources strategies, plus a look at the future.
      • CIR 1 Section 27. 9 pgs. 1997. Tracey Kennedy.
      • Library ID Number: 7568
  • Types of Cooperatives
    • http://www.nwcdc.coop/Resources/CSS/CSS01Types.pdf
      • This document categorizes cooperatives into one of five types based on ownership and goals. These types include consumer cooperatives, worker cooperatives, producer cooperatives, purchasing/service cooperatives and housing cooperatives.
      • Library ID Number: 7639
  • Shared Service Cooperatives
    • http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/rbs/pub/rr141.pdf
      • The general structure and operations of shared-services cooperatives and benefits that accrue to their owners are discussed in this report. It provides insight into the corporate structure, governance, and management and describes elements that promote the success of these cooperatives. This type of cooperative is widely adapted to rural community services provided by schools, hospitals, small businesses, churches, and local governments by lowering operating cost by obtaining services and products through these organizations.
      • Research Report 141. 14 pgs. Reprinted 1997. Anthony C. Crooks, Karen Spatz, and Marc Warman.
      • Library ID Number: 2567
  • Petroleum Cooperatives, 1993
    • http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/rbs/pub/rr143.pdf
      • Agricultural cooperatives play a significant role in providing petroleum products to U.S. farmers and rural markets. A 1993 study showed that they provided 41 percent of the petroleum products used by U.S. farmers for farm production, up slightly from 1988. More than 2,500 regional and local cooperatives sold $5.2 billion worth of petroleum products in 1993. Challenges to cooperatives and new opportunities are also outlined.
      • Research Report 143. 15 pgs. 1995. E. Eldon Eversull and John R. Dunn.
      • Library ID Number: 2810
  • Fertilizer Operations of Local Farm Supply and Marketing Cooperatives
    • http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/rbs/pub/rr161.pdf
      • This report analyzes the fertilizer operations of 497 local farm supply and marketing cooperatives. They were surveyed about their 1996 fertilizer sales, source of product, competitors and type of competition, and services offered or desired to offer. Four questions focused on the relatively new use of global positioning and geographic information systems in fertilizer use and application. Fertilizer sales trends for these cooperatives during the past 11 years were compared to questionnaire responses, sales growth, and a prior survey. The data was also divided into 10 standard U.S. farm production regions and four cooperative sizes and types.
      • Research Report 162. 25 pgs. 1998. Julie A. Hogeland.
      • Library ID Number: 2792
  • Marketing Fed Cattle: Cooperative Opportunity
    • http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/rbs/pub/sr38.pdf
      • Cattle feeders that are increasingly concerned about market access and pricing methods due to structural changes in the marketplace may wish to form a marketing cooperative to collectively market cattle. Three types of fed cattle cooperatives are discussed: bargaining cooperatives, electronic marketing cooperatives, and integrated cattle feeding/meatpacking cooperatives.
      • Service Report 38. 51 pgs. 1993. Clement E. Ward, Timm J. Bliss, and Julie A. Hogeland.
      • Library ID Number: 2883
  • Section 15; Marketing Cooperatives, Marc Warman
    • http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/rbs/pub/cir4515.pdf
      • This article discusses the various types of marketing cooperatives and the marketing methods they use. It also presents the reasons why marketing cooperatives were developed.
      • Library ID Number: 3449
  • Farm Marketing, Supply and Service Cooperative Historical Statistics
    • http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/rbs/pub/cir1s26.pdf
      • This article provides time series data on marketing, farm supply, and related service cooperatives from 1863 to 1996. Statistics include memberships and number of cooperatives by type, business volume by commodity, and size of business. Information is carried on new organizations and discontinuances of cooperatives. Market share data for selected years is provided.
      • CIR 1 Section 26. 81 pgs. Revised 1998. Celestine C. Adams.
      • Library ID Number: 7263